IKEA take the articulated option

Send to friend

Global home furnishings company IKEA has ordered a fleet of three Flexi EURO articulated trucks from Narrow Aisle for use in the goods-in warehouse at its Milton Keynes UK store.

Trailers deliver to the stores extensive storage area every day and the Flexi EUROs will be used to unload incoming vehicles and deliver palletised loads directly to the racking within the Milton Keynes stores extensive warehouse.

A compact four wheel truck, the Flexi EURO has the ability to lift 1800kg loads. With lift heights of over 8 metres in very narrow aisles, it is suitable for facilities where space is at a premium.

The Flexi EURO features all the design characteristics that have made the Flexi the biggest selling range of articulated trucks in Europe, but features a compact chassis and narrow front axle that allows it to work in aisles as narrow as 1600mm wide. The compact EURO chassis is ideal for general forklift duties like block stacking and drive-in racking as well as conventional Very Narrow Aisle (VNA) stacking.

Like all models in the Flexi range, the Flexi EURO is able to work inside and outside. This versatility has enabled Ikea to reduce double handling at the Milton Keynes outlet. Instead of a combination of counterbalance and reach trucks, the company now uses Flexis to unload trailers and put away pallets directly into the racking and, as a result, has been able to reduce the overall size of the forklift fleet in operation at the store.

John Maguire, Narrow Aisles sales and marketing director, commented: Articulated truck users know that articulated trucks allow pallets to be picked and put away notably faster than with a reach truck. The fact that an articulated truck does not have to waste time reaching in and out of the pallet and the racking to retrieve a load makes for a far more efficient work cycle.

This allied to the fact that they can work both inside and outside was a big influence on Ikeas decision to use Flexi EUROs.

Founded in 1958, IKEA has a network of some 300 stores worldwide.

Comments (0)

Add a Comment

This thread has been closed from taking new comments.